Banner photo of eagle by LDS Earth Stewardship member Ralph Johnson taken near the Susquehanna River.

BOOKS

We'll post books of interest here along with reviews.  Join other earth stewards online to discuss books at goodreads.com, LDS Earth Stewardship group.  If there's interest we can set up a live video link for book discussions. If you have a must-read suggestion for us, email merikays@verizon.net.

A sampling of the books read by the LDSES group in Utah is below followed by suggested books from ESE readers.

Our next book discussion will be Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed To Roll Back Global Warming, by Paul Hawken.

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From the Dust Jacket:
"In the face of widespread fear and apathy, an international coalition of researchers, professionals, and scientists have come together to offer a set of realistic and bold solutions to climate change. One hundred techniques and practices are described here--some are well known; some you may have never heard of. They range from clean energy to educating girls in lower-income countries to land use practices that pull carbon out of the air. The solutions exist, are economically viable, and communities throughout the world are currently enacting them with skill and determination. If deployed collectively on a global scale over the next thirty years, they represent a credible path forward, not just to slow the earth's warming but to reach drawdown, that point in time when greenhouse gases in the atmosphere peak and begin to decline. These measures promise cascading benefits to human health, security, prosperity, and well-being--giving us every reason to see this planetary crisis as an opportunity to create a just and livable world."
October 2, 2019
6:30 - 8:00 pm (8:30 - 10 pm EST)
2054 Hollywood Avenue
Salt Lake City, UT

Our moderator poses the following questions to consider as you are reading:
What do you think of Hawken's proposals?
Are they practical? Promising?
What obstacles have prevented implementation before now?
Which are most appealing to you, personally?


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The LDSES book discussion for April 2019 was the classic, My First Summer in the Sierra, by John Muir. This book captures the joy and reverence with which he first encountered the Range of Light. Almost 150 years later, Muir's keen and eloquent observations remind us of the beauty of the earth, and our responsibility to be wise stewards.

 
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First published in 1949, this is a classic among nature books. Written by Aldo Leopold who was not only a wield-life ecologist, conservationist, graduate of Yale School of Forestry and professor at the University of Wisconsin but also a gifted writer.  Leopold's close observations of nature (and human nature) inform and inspire.  That this book was published nearly 70 years ago adds a dimension to the current reader who compares our world with that of Leopold.

Book for October 2018 LDSES discussion.  I have read a wonderful book by Jane Goodall which covers this topic (and more), Seeds of Hope: Wisdom and Wonder from the World of Plants, 2013. You’ll never feel the same about plants and specifically trees and their interrelationships after learning about the ways trees communicate. — Merikay

Book for October 2018 LDSES discussion.

I have read a wonderful book by Jane Goodall which covers this topic (and more), Seeds of Hope: Wisdom and Wonder from the World of Plants, 2013. You’ll never feel the same about plants and specifically trees and their interrelationships after learning about the ways trees communicate. — Merikay

Florence Williams spoke to the LDS Earth Stewardship group and others on Dec. 7, 2017. This was the inaugural book for the LDSES book group.

Florence Williams spoke to the LDS Earth Stewardship group and others on Dec. 7, 2017. This was the inaugural book for the LDSES book group.

Suggested reading from ESE members:

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Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History

Elizabeth Kolbert

Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us. 

Book suggested by ESE member Kate Cummings.


Stewardship and the Creation

LDS Perspectives on the Environment

Edited by George B. HandleyTerry B. Ball and Steven L. Peck

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This book is a collection of essays from a BYU symposium on “Our Stewardship: Perspectives on Caring for Creation” held in 2004 yet still very current. The following comes from the book's introduction: 

These essays demonstrate that [LDS]Church scriptures and teachings provide a consistent picture of human beings as stewards accountable before God for the use and care of His creations. They reaffirm and develop further what previous examinations of Latter-day Saint theology and history have repeatedly demonstrated: our religion offers a unique and important perspective on the notion of environmental stewardship and a foundation for a strong environmental ethic....

We hope it is not recklessly naive to look forward to a time when a commonly accepted sense of obligation to the well-being of the physical world and to future human generations overrides political and religious differences. It is perhaps one of the more shameful aspects of our current age that things as patently universal as the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the food we eat have become partisan footballs tossed about in an effort to gain our political loyalty. Environmental stewardship is not an issue that has to be a battle between liberals and conservatives; it entails the best impulses of liberal generosity and conservative restraint. The profound contributions of various Christian ecotheologians over the past decades have provided an example of how to tap into the rich doctrines of the Bible to articulate an ethic with regard to the environment and without regard to partisan infighting. These authors have taught that environmental stewardship is neither something we can afford to compartmentalize in our lives nor something we should allow to become politicized.”

Book recommended by Chris Mathews, ESE member.  This book is available for free online https://rsc.byu.edu/%5Bfield_status-raw%5D/stewardship-and-creation-lds-perspectives-environment

The forest Unseen: A Year's Watch In Nature

David George Haskill

Biologist David Haskell uses a one-square-meter patch of old-growth Tennessee forest as a window onto the entire natural world. Visiting it almost daily for one year to trace nature’s path through the seasons, he brings the forest and its inhabitants to vivid life. Each of this book’s short chapters begins with a simple observation: a salamander scuttling across the leaf litter; the first blossom of spring wildflowers. From these, Haskell spins a brilliant web of biology and ecology, explaining the science that binds together the tiniest microbes and the largest mammals and describing the ecosystems that have cycled for thousands—sometimes millions—of years. Each visit to the forest presents a nature story in miniature as Haskell elegantly teases out the intricate relationships that order the creatures and plants that call it home.

Book suggested by Kate Cummings.

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Bringing Nature Home: How Native plants sustain wildlife in our gardens

Douglas W. Tallamy

As development and subsequent habitat destruction accelerate, there are increasing pressures on wildlife populations. But there is an important and simple step toward reversing this alarming trend: Everyone with access to a patch of earth can make a significant contribution toward sustaining biodiversity.

I’ve heard Dr. Tallamy speak several times and read his books. If you wonder why I spend so much time creating habitat through gardening and encouraging others to do the same—you’ll find the answer in these books

The Living Landscape, published in 2014, has more color photographs and specific garden design ideas while Bringing Nature Home emphasizes the scope of the problem of habitat loss and how we can create wildlife preserves through our home gardens. Even a small garden can be a place of refuge.

Books suggested by Merikay Smith.